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20121206
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allocation. how do you generate returns and manage volatility in this kind of environment where there's so much you can't control? global head of institutional clients with jpmorgan asset management, welcome. i'm going to ask something that may be counter intuitive to a lot of people. maybe not to you. it seems to me your clients, institutions, pensions, endowments, are tax exempt. they don't have to worry quite as much it would seem to me about avoiding dividend taxes or capital gains taxes as ordinary individuals. am i right about that or wrong? >> yes and no. the point being if the fiscal cliff you look at china, eurozone, it is all coming together to create an environment of total uncertainty for a lot of the biggest investors in the world. pension funds in the u.s. are trying to manage the volatility of the funding levels, generating return. think of where the average u.s. pension fund is trying to again rate a return from 6.5% to 8%. >> it's not so much that they're concerned about a looming tax hike that might affect their portfolios as it is about the uncertainty that the cliff rep
, that's a target-rich environment is what we refer to california. they raise taxes again. they sent the message that the unions are going to continue to control the process out there. they defeated proposition 32. they passed proposition 30 which was the increase in their taxes. so, california businessmen and women are looking at their bottom line saying, where are we going to go? other places? >> governor, is it too much of a leap to say when we do this at the federal level they leave the country, bilss can eventually leave the country. >> sure. >> but we can't seem to make the leap to say that. and i'm talking about the fiscal cliff now. i wonder if you were at 25% of gdp, if the government had grown to this size where it is right now and you were trying to figure out how to deal with it and you were in charge, would it be all about -- would the first thing you come up with be raising taxes? would not -- wouldn't you address the spending -- wouldn't you address the spending side of -- >> right. >> -- and, you know, the republicans are trying to criticize the obama proposals by say
in this new environment that we find ourselves in post-election and particularly with respect to the susan rice piece which is -- ha, gender, all these little sexy pieces to it, how do republicans that you're hearing see that? >> it's interesting. i was talking amazingly to more democrats yesterday. they said we just want to have a fight on the floor. we just don't want to have this thing where you can stick something and say i've got a hold on it and nothing happens. we want the american people to have to actually watch. if they don't want susan rice, let them stand on the floor and actually have to talk about it so that the world will see it. and then the people can judge. but it's not like that now. you just stick something in a closet. >> so what's the possibility of their actually being filibuster reform? this comes up after every election cycle. what's so special about now that makes it possible that the republicans and democrats will come together and do this? >> i think there's so much pressure on harry reid to do something. he can do it by himself with his own party's votes. if he
that environment look like? >> i don't think that's what happens. we're not talking about taking tax rates from 35 to 50 or 60. we're talking a few percentage points. so it's uncertainty, well do i get my deductions, do i pay a hayer rate? what is my mix and until then i sit on my hands. bringing up the again the uncertainty factor. i think we get to a point where we get some sort of compromise around these things. we'll get back through a muddle through economy. not a great one but good enough one. david: the president's comments of last year notwithstanding where he was for lowering rates. rates go up in one way, shape or form. rather than spending money in the stock market where people get taxed more they think of more direct investment? more vehicles that avoid the stock market entirely and get cash directly to the companies? >> that could happen and would be good for the economy which in a perverse way would be good for the stock market as well if you see my logic. getting people to move off the dime. to say i don't need this hoard of cash frankly earning almost nothing. i need to put it to w
their muscle and have the backing of the current political environment. >> brenda: larry. >> brenda, the younes need to reinvent themselves. if they need to get into my skilled jobs and earn higher wages and that's the key. >> you're right and the idea of organizing the lowest end of the structure here is, as jonas says, the average lifetime of employee i think is nine months in the fast food business so it's antithetical and-- >> these aren't coal mines and slaughter houses, brenda, these are folding sweaters at the gap, cashiers. >> we need to see more unions in china where they could make a difference, they could lift wages and improve living standards there. >> absolutely. >> and keep chinese, work forces from taking jobs away from america. >> good luck with that. >> brenda: thank you for the debate. and sandy victims facing devastation one month later, so is this any time for the united nations to be using them as a fund raising tool? the cavuto gang is all over that one at the bottom of the hour. up here first, forget fees in the health care law, and the fees to implement it. how much are
remember to put money to work. in an environment where not people put money to work and people aren't doing anything, you get an influx of retail money. you have to commit that money to your retirement and to your kids. >> interesting. >> it's a big difference. >> btig has a note on seasonality regarding the end of the year and even december '08 was positive. how resilient the month of december is. >> funny you mention that. that was such a false tell. we thought maybe things had bottomed and then just off a cliff, not fiscal but stock right after that. it's a great note. >> meantime, as we await the opening bell this morning, we'll look at the s&p 500 at the realtime exchange on the top of your screen. big board here. >> there's the bell over at the nasdaq today, sears holdings and st. jude's children's research hospital celebrating the st. jude thanks and giving campaign. lead story involves delta and talks they say to acquire from singapore some stakes in virgin atlanta. >> we'll see what happens. they have been active. the one people are more focused on is american airlines in bankruptc
in a slow growth environment, but they've kept interest rates very low in japan, but the problem is, government is too big. that's why japan has not been able to start growing again. and this is the path that the u.s. is certainly on if we don't change that dynamic. >> paul: kim, is there any recognition about this in washington or is it all -- i mean, do you hear any of this discussion or do they really believe, certainly, the white house and the treasury, that tax rates like this don't matter, at that ultimately-- >> no, they do to a degree. if you talk to the officials iran up, come on, so we're going to raise the rates, what is fascinating to put it in the bigger context of the debate about tax revenue, the economists have the static view, you've got x-amounts of capital gains income and you get 20% more tax revenue. >> you don't, because people decide to shelter it. they do their transactions the year before, when the amount is less. and so, all of these numbers that the white house is counting on and sort of rubbing its hands together hoping to get. they're not going to get an
to look over the long haul, over the long-term, whether you have an environment that's right for business. i think in arizona we are trying to get things right so over the long haul we can build a more diverse sustainable economy. i think we are headed in the right direction. stuart: i'm not being flip here, what kind of tax break dos you offer them -- tax breaks do you offer them, just give me an idea. >> if you bring manufacturing to our state, you are going to get a tax credit. if you bring research and development, you will get a tax credit. if you engage in sustainability, green jobs, you will get a tax credit. look, we saw the landscape around the country, and we wanted to make sure we were as competitive as possible. and a lot of it is not going to be companies moving from california, but as this economy improves, a lot of companies are going to be expanding. and we want them to look to our city, our state as they make those important expansion decisions, particularly again for those jobs. stuart: do you actually go to california yourself and try to prize them loose? >> i have been
's always a but, environment during the first two week of november was challenging. as far as the outlook, they continue to be cautious that the remainder of the quarter given the inconsistency we are seeing in the business. with these headlines, putting out a cautionary tale land as a result seeing retailers do so well today pulling back in the after-hours. liz: dave: the fiat brand is facing problems overseas. liz: rolling out three new models, they are high functioning and the l a auto show, jeff flock is there with the head of fiat north american. >> i showed you the five door. here is the electric fee of 500. the head of fiat in the usa said to me is this a huge day for you. >> we have been in the market for less than two years, and launching five -- >> five new products. and we are looking at a huge success for us, we are launching the 500 e full battery electric. and the sport version of full battery electric watching the 500 l today which is the five dorr we're looking at and launching the treking version as well. >> you can imagine, those following this, fee of around the world h
exceptionally clear, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call 1-800-511-3035 or visit trylyric.com for a risk-free 30 day trial offer and free dvd and brochure. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. >>> police in arizona are desperately searching for this 11-year-old leukemia patient. she disappeared six days ago, just one day shy of being released from the hospital. but here's the thing. doctors fear this catheter in this girl's heart could possibly lead to an infection, could endanger her life. girl, she's identified only as emily, and you see her here walking on the right side of that, with her mother on the left. this is surveillance video, leaving phoenix children's hospital. the woman allegedly removed the girl's iv, changed her clothes, and walked her out the door. as for why, no one seems to know. the 11-year-old already had to have her right arm amputated because of an infection and is in desperate need of me
to wait to see exactly what this news in. but in the environment of the fiscal cliff, if, indeed, what this is, it would be interesting. >> all right, john. thanks so much. >> ncr, national cash register. right? >> you like that? >> i like that because you got to change the name. cash registers aren't what they used to be. >> that stock is halted along with the other one john was talking about. we'll let you know when the news does come out and that stock is reop reopened for business. speaking of business, we have about 30 more minutes of business. >> top ceos set for a fiscal cliff meeting with president obama just over an hour from now. we're going to take you live to the white house next. plus, we'll hear from one democratic lawmaker willing to dive head first off the cliff if that's what it takes to reach what he thinks is a good deal on tax hikes while protecting entitlements. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 this morning, i'm going to trade in hong kong. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-
they do. that's political environment. they might as well embrace the fiscal cliff. >> you heard peter difazio saying earlier in the program, democrat, go off the cliff, there is no cliff. no problem. >> folks on both sides. look, there's not a clip there and they're going to play chicken and go off. >> and then you're road kill at the bottom. >> that's exactly right. most folks are saying since the economy's improving, congress, don't screw it up and you get some folks on the far left and far right, there's no cliff, don't worry about this. we're after the election, this isn't an id logical debating society. this is about getting something done. let's work on a short-term deal. >> the deal that's there, we're in this situation because congress came up with what they're calling the fiscal cliff now and they're calling it the fiscal cliff because they don't want to e embrace either the tax increases or spending cuts and i think it's foolish to think this congress can come up with a better deal. >> you know what's interesting, to eric's point, there is a great irony in this that the demo
environment, but having just come off a serious electoral college win. >> yeah. and i think -- i mean, it's kind of remarkable the change in tone. and it's not -- it's not the kind of abject capitulation that one might expect. or one might think might be warranted by what the voter said at the polls. but it is a modulation in tone that has been completely absent during the entirety of the first four years. there was almost nothing like this, even from day one when the president was sworn in, the first time around. we are seeing at least a little bit of an acknowledgment that they are on the wrong side of the majority of the american public on these key issues. >> joy, the -- my sense of what's going on here is that you're really seeing shadow boxing. that boehner knows, there is nothing i can do. we're going to have to go off the curb for my members to understand where we really are. we're going to have to have one week of the united states of america operating under higher tax brackets, higher withholding, on takehome pay. and then i'll be able to talk some sense to them. and from the pr
, to be a welcoming, supportive environment for patients who want to live normal lives. >> to make it, you know, human, to make it tender, to make it hospitable. when people ask me, is it hard? no, it's not hard. it's a privilege to do that. >> it really gets to you, doesn't it? >> yeah. >> you're taking more than we now consider a safe dose. >> many of these patients are here because some physicians and legislators are trying to curb washington state's prescription drug overdose problem. >> i think this is the worst manmade epidemic in history. >> dr. gary franklin is medical director for the state of washington's department of labor and industries. when is the first time this even became an issue that you had noticed? >> by 2001, our claims managers were sending me cases of injured workers who had had a low-back sprain and who were dead three years later from an unintentional overdose of prescribed opioids. it was the saddest thing i'd ever seen. >> so he took action, helping write guidelines that this year became state law. it applies to non-cancer chronic pain patients. it mandates prescriber educ
. >> he designed the center for pain relief, he says, to be a welcoming, supportive environment for patients who want to live normal lives. >> to make it, you know, human, to make it tender, to make it hospitable. when people ask me, is it hard? no, it's not hard. it's a privilege to do that. >> it really gets to you, doesn't it? >> by 2001, our claims managers were sending me cases of injured workers who had had a low-back sprain and who were dead three years later from an unintentional overdose of prescribed opioids. it was the saddest thing i'd ever seen. >> so he took action, helping write guidelines that this year became state law. it applies to non-cancer chronic pain patients. it mandates prescriber education, treatment plans called pain contracts between physicians and patients, and tracking of opioid use. if states don't follow new laws reflecting best practices and universal prautions so opioids can be used safely and effectively, this will never turn around. >> the washington state law does have its share of critics, many of whom are patients dealing with pain right n
and in iraq throughout that whole period. women have performed extremely well in all of those environments. so i think even within our own country, there's plenty of evidence suggesting that women are very capable of handle these jobs. >> you know, the military's official policy towards servicewomen goes back to 1994. that's when this rule was put in place. why do you think it hasn't been looked at? what more needs to be done? >> well, for a number of years, we weren't really actively at war, so people weren't really looking at it. while we were at war, people have been concerned about just fighting the fight and getting the job done. but personally, i am a little surprised that since we have been at war for ten years, people haven't looked more closely at this, haven't looked at the reality of what is going on on the ground in iraq and afghanistan and haven't been making more steps to move this away. so i think we're headed there now. better late than never, i suppose, but we need to see this happen here soon. >> in getting ready for this segment with you, we contacted the department of defen
in an urban environment where spark makes a huge amount of sense. it's a great package. we'll do something here. >> one last question. we were talking about we went on. you have been in this industry for a long time. you can't remember the last time there was this much optimism in the auto industry. is it sustainable? >> obviously everything goes in cycles. we talked a little bit about that. the economy obviously here is something that's variable right now. i think the industry and i think most oems and particularly the supply base that's changed their break even points through this cycle to a place where we haven't been before. the agility of the industry and companies that are in it both supply and oem, that agility enables a huge amount of product investments and if you look at the stands at this show, the competitive products here are -- i have never seen it in the industry. it's very exciting. we can do it and make money. the industry is in a healthy point right now. >> mark joining us when you look around the show here, there's more optimism than you usually see at an auto show. comi
is to commence direct negotiations and we need an environment conducive to that. we have urged both parties to refrain from actions that might in any way make a return to meaningful negotiations -- >> now, brooke, president abbas promised to return to negotiations after the vote. but with israel so opposed to the move it doesn't seem likely. prime minister benjamin netanyahu slammed the resolution calling it one-sided saying it doesn't take into account israel's security interests and it pushes the peace process back. israel is threatening to withhold a hundred million dollars a month in tax revenues from the palestinians, further restrict movement of plib officials and there is about 500 million in u.s. economic and security aid at stake. congress withheld aid last year when they joined unesco. that's gone through. this could certainly trigger a cut from aid in washington leaving the palestinians in dire straits. maybe lead to the collapse of the palestinian authority and renewed violence in the region. this strengthen it is happened of hamas who was riding high after the gaza cease-fire l
left, let's talk about the current environment. what are you hearing from a lot of the senior executives that are asking for your advice or if you're in a board room or chatting with them especially in terms of the fiscal cliff and concern about making big decisions or lack thereof and not putting money at it. >> the interesting part is talk about the fiscal cliff is the talk about the talk about the fiscal cliff. i don't think people are as concerned as the level of chatter that goes around. i think the chatter is more than the concern. the fiscal cliff just happens to be a preset deal on a scale of one to ten. it's a deal that is possible as outcome. i think what the country should hope for is that we come up with a better deal. business wants the rules. i understand why business is very much do a deal. do a something. because a business then can make their plans around that. if a marginal tax rate goes up too high here, they'll put a plant somewhere else. you can make those decisions. they want to know the rules. >> know the rules of the road. >> there's an america out ther
the united states capable of holding the 166 detainees who remain in guantanamo in an environment that meets the security requirements. you're saying the same thing but it is, it is the legal basis you have to figure out now. there is this prison talked about in illinois. i'm not sure whether that is going forward. whether it is stuck in the mud at the moment. a practical application for what you're suggesting, perhaps, at some point, some day, we find those who are responsible for killing our u.s. ambassador in benghazi, libya. if we get those people, where do we take them? >> well there's the question. what are the rules? would the department of justice say? what would the bureau of prisons say? all this still needs to be worked out. gitmo is over 10 years old. it will be 11 in january. and we're still, we still don't have those kinds of things. we could have been talking about that for years, especially, i remember when the president signed the gitmo closure order. he started signing it and somebody asked him where are we going to put these people when you close it and he stopped signing
to part time, in the environment where we're looking at 8% unemployment, this isn't about solving the economy. it's very obvious now. stuart: all politics all the time, it is redistribution, it's neo-socialism, forget what it will actually do to economic growth, no, what will it do for my political legacy? >> that's the point. it's advancing the causes of bureaucracy and dependency. so you have people who they no long very a full-time job. they have a part-time job. they need more government benefits you need a bigger bureaucracy to administer it. i'm not a big government fan. if you catch say the euro train on the continent two hours from brussels, that's pretty good, if you want government spending, here's something to show for it. there's nothing to show for it here except the department of bureaucratic compliance. charles: this was a big beef with the stimulus package. they are like -- they built a bridge that took me to stuart and it took them two years to do it. charles: hold on a second. i have to go to nicole, a bank announced they are cutting 11,000 positions? they are re
americans who saved it do not have enough for environment. lori: should average investors follow the institutions? >> yeah, you know, one of the things we are seeing is a lot of institutions have held off or have looked at managing risk and mitigating in their own portfolios. you are looking at this longer-term investing. writing to the store. looking at structures that allow you to mitigate risk and have better sleeping at night. you cannot fund a retirement by earning a half of a percent of 1% and a stable money market fund or bond. you will need to take some risk. sure. i was just going to come in with a risk. should i go risk on all the way and really go crazy and put in some, you know -- [talking over each other] >> it all depends on what your circumstances are. if you have some longer-term horizons, you should be looking out what type of risk you can look at in the portfolio. the big dynamic change has been risks moving from i do not want to miss the upside to a game i want to watch and protect my principal. it is about risk budgeting now more than the way i need to allocat
every year. you propose to raise taxes in that environment and you're not going to get growth. >> don't you understand you need to off set-- if you're serious about debt reduction, i think you are, don't you understand you need revenue and spending cuts. stuart: and how do you get revenues. >> how. >> please, go ahead, go ahead. stuart: it's easy you lower tax rates and keep incentive to work harder. >> we've tried that. stuart: and you can't-- what. >> george bush tried that. look at the deficit we had. stuart: well, wait a minute you cannot rewrite economic history. after george bush lowered tax rates the return to the treasury, the money coming into the treasury went way up and the deficit, by the way, in 2007 was 167 billion dollars. >> so. stuart: president obama has got, 167 billion a month just about. don't rewrite economic history, julie. >> i'm not rewriting economic history. stuart: you are. >> i'm not-- >> i'm telling you if you lower tax rates you'll get more revenue. >> that's how do you it. >> i think history showed whether it's ronald reagan or-- >> ronald reagan, georg
begin with feeding america, maggie? because america's food environment has so many -- is laden with problems. >> one in five children in 50 million food impoverished americans, 1 in 5 are children. i think this news really struck howard buffett by surprise in his own hometown of decatur. i think two-thirds of the high school students are taking free lunches. and that, he said, was in a town where food processing is its home. >> exactly. >> and he basically decided, this is a problem we can fix. as he says in the piece, he wants to put hunger in america out of business, which does sound a lot like his dad. >> hard to do because you have to also look at the food and how it's made and the processing is such a part of the problem because you can have a hungry child who's also obese. and it doesn't make sense, but when you look at the way food is prepared and what is fed to these children when they can eat, it's not a good option for them. >> it's not, but you know, howard says, too, that there's no shortage of food, good produce food, in america that farmers either don't farm or ha
environment again and really if you look at the economy, we're probably going back to the '90 style economy where you had 3%, 3.5% was really good growth. 2% growth which we're experiencing right now is pretty good. full employment might be 5.5, 6% like the old days. and i think with that being said, we've got to to get a little bit closer to those numbers to really have the economy start to take off. and i don't think we're that far in there. >> any much those numbers we would take. i don't know whether we are or not. wishful thinking for cantor. certainly would help you guys. why didn't you like fighting irish? >> they were on tv every week when i was a child and i'd like to see alabama win. >> alabama won last year. >> that's okay. all right. thank you. see you later. >>> in fact in some of the squawk sports news this morning, dallas beating philadelphia in sunday night nfl game. 38-33. tony romo threw three touchdown passes to break troy aikman's career franchise record. and the jets beat the cardinals 7-6. new york scoring the lone touchdown after mark sanchez was benched with tim tebo
, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> i'm brooke baldwin live in new york today. developing right now, round two for ambassador susan rice. she's meeting with the second group of her critics on capitol hill. and so far it's pretty much a replay of yesterday. the meeting that ambassador rice requested with the senators did not go as well, apparently bringing her no closer to gaining their support if rice is nominated for the post of secretary of state. >> i continue to be troubled by the fact that the u.n. ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role at the height of a contentious presidential election campaign. >> i would just ask the president to step back for a moment and realize that all of us here hold the secretary of state to a very different standard than most cabinet members. >> you know the story, ambassador rice has been under really intense scrutiny for publicly repeating cia talking points that the attack that killed four americans in benghazi, back on sept
because it's such a masculine environment, you try to mask everything. if you hurt your ankle, you fake it and run it off like nothing's wrong. especially if you have an emotional or mental problem. you're certainly going to mask it. along the way if you don't you're going to get weeded out. football is a game of attrition. the weak don't make it to the top levels. so you mask any issues or demons that you may have so that you can get to that top level. i think it's a disservice, quite honestly, to the individuals in the games. because statistics will tell you that there are a couple guys in the nfl that have mental issues and it doesn't get addressed often enough. >> back to joe linta for a second. we know jovan went to the field and the facility and he talked to his coaches. i mean, he was talking to them with a gun to his head. why do you think his instinct after he kills his girlfriend, the baby in the other room, would be to go and thank his coaches? >> i think the instinct would have been the kind of young man that he was and the way he was raised that, you know, he probably -- i
around you and we all are products of our environment. the amount of contact we were taking, the amount of fire fights, rpgs, rockets, whatever it may be. that tour for us was a 15-month tour, which was it shall that's pretty long for some young people. we are there to help them out, find ways of doing the same thing they've been doing. when i wrote the book i want ed to describe the valley and the people around me. so often i'm congratulated or patted on the back and thanked and i've never done anything in the military alone. i was able to put my buddies' names in print and highlight the actionses they've done. there are so many things that we don't hear about. >> our good friend sebastien younger who talked about stalked about your heroism, your unit, and the terrible conditions. i remember reading about it. it seemed remarkable what you did. what you did and how you describe it like so many other recipients that said in the past, i did my job. it was reflex. i was trained well and i was going to save my buddies. talk about that night. and also the reluctance to be called a hero. i've
and that's what you get in living in newark, new jersey, in an urban environment where the food is not particularly cheap is tough. you're right, they're not paying for every meal and calorie he's ingesting but that's not much food. >> what's part of that discussion a twitter conversation where somebody said the state shouldn't be responsible for nutrition, right? and because part of the problem here is that people who are food stamps don't have access to really healthy food. you see cory booker made his, you know, best attempt at getting healthy food, frozen vegetables, canned beans and things like that. that is part of the problem with nutrition and poverty stricken areas. >> and that amount. we have to take a short break. >> [ inaudible ]. >> still ahead -- >> have a job, son. >> you do. i'm going to check you. >> "the new york post" and its photographer taking heat over the cover photo of a man taking minutes before his death he was crushed by the train. did the paper cross the line in publishing that picture. we'll talk about that coming up. lashawn's got her christmas list
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)